Schedule

Schedule

*Online talks will be broadcast live in room C-6070-9 (pav. Lionel-Groulx) via Jitsi.
Collaborative notes are available here (multilingual notes and important links).

  • Schedule
    Topic / Speaker
  • 09.00 AM
    Welcome and breakfast
  • 9.30 AM
    C-6070-9
    Welcome speech
    Marcello Vitali-Rosati, Dominic Forest, Mathilde Verstraete

  • [SESSION 1] The Scientific News of the Greek Anthology.
  • 10.00 AM
    C-6070-9
    Editing Greek Epigrams: Methods and Problems.
    Lucia FLORIDI (Alma Mater Studiorum - Università di Bologna)
    Biography Lucia Floridi is a Professor of Classical and Late Antique Philology at the Department of Classical Philology and Italian studies of the Alma Mater Studiorum - University of Bologna. Her main research interests are Greek and Latin epigrams, with a focus on the erotic and scoptic genres, Hellenistic poetry, prose poetry of the Imperial Age, and the relationship between literature and visual arts. Among her major publications are Stratone di Sardi. Epigrammi (Edizioni Dell’Orso, 2007), Lucillio. Epigrammi (De Gruyter, 2014), Edilo. Epigrammi (De Gruyter, 2020), as well as numerous contributions on authors such as Palladas, Ausonius, Longo Sophista, and Lucian.
    Abstract Our knowledge of Greek epigrammatic poetry is mainly based on two fundamental works: the Palatine Anthology (PA) and the Anthology of Planudes (APl). Minor works are added to these, called Syllogae Minores. Some epigrams are also known through indirect tradition (with authors like Athenaeus), or transmitted from papyri or inscriptions. The editors of the Anthology are thus confronted with a complex and changing textual translation, ranging from a textus unicus to much more varied situations. I will illustrate, in the course of my presentation, the main problems - of critical, textual and exegetical nature - that I have encountered in my capacity as editor of several epigrammatic authors (Strato, Lucillius, Hedylus in particular).
  • 11.00 AM
    Coffee Break
  • 11.15 AM
    C-6070-9
    The Anthology on the Web, quid novi?
    Canada Research Chair on Digital Textualities.
    Biography Marcello Vitali-Rosati, Mathilde Verstraete, Margot Mellet, Luiz Capelo
    Abstract Since 2014, the Canada Research Chair in Digital Textualities (CRCDT) is working on a wide project: a digital and collaborative edition of the Greek Anthology. Just like the anthological corpus, the edition’s platform has undergone multiple reconfigurations. This talk aims to review the challenges and stakes of this vast project and to specify its technical ins and outs.
  • 12.00 AM
    Lunch Break

  • [SESSION 2] Valuation and Pedagogy of the Anthological Imaginary.
  • 1.00 PM
    C-6070-9
    Teaching Greek with the Riddles of the Palatine Anthology.
    Simone BETA (Università degli Studi di Siena)
    Biography Simone Beta is Professor of Greek language and literature at the University of Siena. He is the author of numerous monographs and articles on multiple topics such as ancient theatre, rhetoric, epigrammatic poetry (especially enigmas and oracles) and reception of classical culture in the modern era. Regarding comedy, he has mostly worked on Aristophanes and his adpatations. Among his latest publications, we cite Io, un manoscritto : l’Antologia Palatina si racconta, (2019) – which has been translated in french and published by Les Belles Lettres – and Il labirinto della parola. Enigmi, oracoli e sogni nella cultura antica, (2016).
    Abstract According to the preface of Constantine Cephalas, the epigrams of the fourteenth book of the Palatine Anthology had a pedagogical purpose: the problems were useful to teach mathematics; the riddles to teach the language. Can these last enigmatic epigrams be useful today to teach Greek language and, in addition, classical mythology? By comparing these little poems to other poetic riddles testified in Greek and Byzantine literature, this paper will prove that the pedagogical function evoked by Cephalas can still be exploited today.
  • 1.45 PM
    C-6070-9
    Hybrid*
    Uses and enhancements of the digital facsimile of the Palatine Anthology.
    Gustavo FERNÁNDEZ (Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg. University Library ; Collaborative Research Center 933 ‘Material Text Cultures’)
    Biography Gustavo Fernández Riva is a Postdoctoral Scholar at the University of Heidelberg (Germany). As a member of the Collaborative Research Centre ‘Material Text Cultures’, he develops tools for editing and researching pre-modern written objects. He studied medieval literature at the universities of Buenos Aires (Argentina) and Porto (Portugal). His Ph.D. dissertation included a critical edition in TEI and Spanish translation of texts by the Middle High German poet Konrad von Würzburg. His current research projects include using network analysis to study shared manuscript transmission of medieval texts and the creation of an open, collaborative dataset of philological stemmata.
    Abstract The first and largest part of the Palatine Anthology’s manuscript (Codex Palatinus Graecus 23) has been available as a digital facsimile since 2009 at the University Library of Heidelberg. Since then scholars and anyone interested can freely access high quality images of the codex which was previously only available in critical editions or rare and expensive printed facsimiles. This presentation will examine the features of the digital facsimile and its presentation in the website of the University Library of Heidelberg which uses the software DWork. Particular attention will be given to the annotations created jointly and cooperatively between scholars in Heidelberg and Montreal. Finally, existing cases and future possibilities of reuse of the images will be discussed.
  • 2.30 PM
    Coffee Break
  • 2.45 PM
    C-6070-9
    Experiences and Perspectives of the Study of Ancient Greek Between School and Digital Humanities: a Possible Fortleben of the Palatine Anthology.
    Annalisa DI VINCENZO (Liceo classico Luca De Samuele Cagnazzi, Altamura)
    Biography Annalisa di Vincenzo, PhD in Greek and Latin Philology, has been teaching Classics at the Liceo Classico Luca de Samuele Cagnazzi in Altamura since 2005. Following a specialization in software development for didactics, her teaching methods are motivated by the inclusion of digital tools in the classroom. For several years, the project of a digital and collaborative edition of the Greek Anthology (CRCDT) has benefitted from important contributions thanks to the involvement of her students in the editing process on the project’s platform.
    Abstract For the past few years, a pilot experiment in some high schools has been trying to create a way of working in the field of Digital Humanities on the basis of Greek texts: to start from knowledge to then elaborate a research paradigm through translation skills. Epigrams from the Palatine Anthology are translated in participatory translation workshops starting with the digital version of the ancient manuscript from the 10th century BCE, put online by the Perseus Project. On the basis of the Greek poetic text, this practice seeks to identify a possible Fortleben of ancient wisdom in contemporary culture (from music to iconographic arts). Associating Greek repertories with digital tools enables the sharing of different translations and connections to contemporary culture (cf. website Anthologiagraeca.org), and goes to fill a gap as well as build a useful bridge between the school system and academia.
  • 3.30 PM
    C-6070-9
    Hybrid*
    Inside and Beyond the Greek Anthology: New Directions and Challenges in the Study of Callimachean Epigrams.
    Serena CANNAVALE (Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II)
    Biography Serena Cannavale is a doctor in Classical Philology at the Department of Humanities (‘Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici’) of the University of Naples Federico II. Her main research interests are related to Hellenistic epigrams, ancient theatre and the history of classical studies. She has held seminars and lectures in both national and international conferences and published several papers and essays about the history of the Callimachean epigrams' text and their exegesis; the tradition and the reception of classical myths in epigrams from the Hellenistic and the Imperial periods; theatre in ancient Campania. She is editor-in-chief of the journal Atene e Roma and she is involved in the International Project “Dictionnaire de l’épigramme littéraire dans l’Antiquité grecque et romaine” (Directors: Doris Meyer et Céline Urlacher-Becht).
    Abstract Recent years saw a critical analysis of increasing depth of epigrammatic literature, resulting in large-scale studies both on epigrams of epigraphic tradition and on those of literary tradition, and their mutual interplay. Such interest was mostly encouraged by the publication of the Posidippus papyrus, which stimulated new studies on the construction of ancient anthologies and on the arrangement of books of epigrams. Nevertheless, the lack of a recent edition with commentary of Callimachus' epigrams stands out very conspicuously, even though many individual poems have been the object of accurate analysis in valuable papers and monographic studies. Moving from these important recent acquisitions, it is now evident that a modern commentary to Callimachean epigrams should link the individual texts to the epigrammatic tradition as a whole, focusing both on the literary parallels within the Greek Anthology and on their epigraphic counterparts. The present talk suggests to apply this approach through three lines of investigation: 1) paying attention to traditional epigrammatic sub-genres (votive, sepulchral, epideictic, erotic, etc.) and to their realizations within the Callimachean corpus, while considering how traditional categories have permeable boundaries that are not so easily traced (consider for example the problematic case of the label of “epideictic” or “ecphrastic” epigram); 2) studying the continuity of transversal topoi and motifs through these sub-genres (e.g. epigrams on misanthropes; epigrams on poets or poetic works; bucolic themes); 3) considering the possibility to relate Callimachus’ epigrams to less known typologies, like those emerging from the Posidippus papyrus (e.g. nauagika).
  • Schedule
    Topic / Speaker
  • 08.30 AM
    Welcome

  • [SESSION 3] Classical Culture, Digital Practices.
  • 9.00 AM
    C-6070-9
    Hybrid*
    Revealing Latent Information in a Reference Text: the Digital Edition of the Glossary of Greek Birds
    Marie-Claire BEAULIEU (Tufts University, Classics)
    Biography Marie-Claire Beaulieu is a professor of Classical Studies at Tufts University. Her main research areas are Greek mythology (including Greek religion and the role of women in Greek mythology) and Digital Humanities. She co-directed the Perseids project : a large initiative to build infrastructures in the field of digital humanities, through the design of collaborative editing and annotation software. Marie-Claire Beaulieu is also interested in the use of the digital medium to foster greater engagement with the ancient world through the study of language, art and culture.
    Abstract This contribution explores the opportunities offered by digital publishing for non-linear texts. Like the Palatine Anthology, D’Arcy Thompson’s Glossary of Greek Birds (1896 and 1936) was designed to be read flexibly according to the reader’s interests and cross-reference networks. While it is primarily a reference work - essentially a list of Greek bird names combined with ornithological identification through descriptions provided by ancient texts - the most interesting aspect of the Glossary is what it does not explicitly say, for the references to the ancient texts cover a wealth of information about the literary, mythological, and historical associations of the birds cited as well as the relationships among them. This talk will detail the encoding techniques and processes such as formal concept analysis employed by the project to bring out this information and use it as a tool to navigate through the text.
  • 10.15 AM
    Coffee Break
  • 10.30 AM
    C-6070-9
    Round-table Discussion : Today, in the Digital Era….
    Marcello Vitali-Rosati ; Mathilde Verstraete ; Arilys Jia ; Margot Mellet ; Dominic Forest ; Emmanuel Château-Dutier ; Servanne Monjour ; Irene Stigliano.
    Abstract Presided over by Marcello Vitali-Rosati and Arilys Jia, this multilingual round table will give the floor to speakers from different backgrounds to think and redefine the most fundamental aspects of digital technologies according to their worldviews.
  • 12.00 AM
    Lunch Break

  • [SESSION 4] Computational Approaches Applied to Hellenistic Studies.
  • 1.00 PM
    C-6070-9
    Hybrid*
    Opera Graeca Adnotata: an open source corpus for annotated Ancient Greek texts.
    Giuseppe CELANO (Universität Leipzig, Institute of Computer Science)
    Biography Giuseppe Celano’s academic profile is at the intersection between humanities (linguistics and classics) and computer science. He started his academic career as a classicist, with a focus on the study of Ancient Greek and Latin grammar. He obtained his PhD in Classical Philology in 2008, with a thesis on word order in Plato’s Phaedo. He was a research fellow for a German-Italian research project on the structure of the argument in Ancient Greek and Yucatec Mayan, run at the University of Erfurt and Pavia, from 2012-2013. Subsequently, in late 2013, he joined the Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at Leipzig University to work on Ancient Greek and Latin treebanks. In April 2018, he joined the Natural Language Processing Group of Leipzig University, where he worked until September 2018 on a DFG (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft) project on actionality classes and coding asymmetries. In the same Institute, he has been an independent DFG researcher since October 2018, working on the annotation of Ancient Greek and Latin data.
    Abstract This contribution aims to present the Opera Graeca Adnotata (OGA) corpus. OGA provides morphosyntactic annotations for most Ancient Greek texts of the Perseus Digital Library. In order for the corpus to be scalable, annotations in OGA are following PAULA XML formalism. Currently, the OGA corpus represents the largest open source annotated resource for Ancient Greek, in that both texts and the attached annotations can be freely queried and reused under a CC BY-NC 4.0 licence.
  • 1.45 PM
    C-6070-9
    Feature Importance for Authorship Attribution of Ancient Greek Pseudepigrapha and Forgeries.
    Kyle JOHNSON (TikTok; Co-Maintainer of Classical Language Toolkit (CLTK))
    Biography Kyle P. Johnson works at the intersection of Classics and Natural Language Processing (NLP). He has a Ph.D. in Classics (NYU, 2012) and now works in industry. Having published on Homer and written a dissertation on Julius Caesar, he now devotes his research to the Classical Language Toolkit (CLTK), an open source software project that intends to offer NLP to the roughly 200 extant pre-modern languages.
    Abstract In its simplest form, authorship attribution compares a single suspect text to a larger body of known-authentic texts by identifying anachronisms of history, grammar, and vocabulary. For instance, Lorenzo Valla refuted ancient authorship of the Donatio Constantini by finding grammatical mistakes and turns of phrase that would have been implausible in the 4th century. While the textual critic chooses distinguishing characteristics relevant to the investigation of a specific text, can we generalize about how useful particular features are across all authorship inquiries? This lecture provides quantitative information about the relative importance of categories of features (part-of-speech, syntax, vocabulary, and semantics) to three types of authorship attribution tasks: 1) disambiguation of two authors of the same genre (e.g., Thucydides vs. Polybius); 2) pseudepigrapha, anonymous texts mistakenly attributed during antiquity or the Middle Ages to a known author (e.g., Aristotle vs. Pseudo-Aristotle); and 3) forgeries from the Renaissance through the early Modern era (e.g., Erasmus’s De duplici martyrio). In a series of experiments, attribution of dubious texts is approached as a supervised machine learning task. Using features directly from the Classical Language Toolkit (CLTK) and the same non-optimized algorithm for each comparison, this investigation provides insights into both stylometry for Ancient Greek literature and the utility of the natural language processing (NLP) for authorship attribution.
  • 2.30 PM
    Coffee Break
  • 2.45 PM
    C-6070-9
    The Aftermath of Plato. Searching for Traces in Vector Space.
    Marcus PÖCKELMANN - (Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Institute of Computer Science)
    Biography Marcus Pöckelmann studied Computer Science at the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg and has been a member of the research group Molitor/Ritter since 2013. Within several interdisciplinary research projects, he develops web-based applications for the investigation of intertextuality together with colleagues from different disciplines of the humanities. These include the working environments LERA for the analysis of complex text variants for scholarly editions, and Paraphrasis for the retrieval and evaluation of paraphrased text passages in ancient Greek literature.
    Abstract This lecture presents different approaches and tools we developed within the project Digital Plato for the investigation of the aftermath and reception of Plato’s work. The essential aspect was the search for intertextual references to Plato in ancient Greek literature, especially text passages that have been paraphrased by other authors. One of our approaches, which will be explained here in detail, makes use of word embeddings and the Word Mover’s Distance (WMD) in particular to identify them. It was integrated into a comprehensive, web-based work environment that allows the exploratory analysis of such references. In fact, the tools developed for the Platonic works have become so versatile that they can also be applied to the study of aftermath and reception development of other ancient authors within the corpus.
  • 3.30 PM
    C-6070-9
    AI for ancient languages, insights for small corpus processing.
    Marianne REBOUL (École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Institut d’histoire des représentations et des idées dans la modernité)
    Biography Marianne Reboul is a lecturer in Digital Humanities at the École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, specializing in digital humanities and classics, more precisely in “digital classics”. She works in particular on the application of artificial intelligence techniques to ancient languages.
    Abstract Language modeling systems via deep learning are dependent on clean and massive data. However, such data does not exist for all languages nor eras. It is therefore necessary to go through other less traditional ways, especially if we want to study the way ancient texts were translated. Indeed, translations are only loosely aligned with the various source texts to which they refer, especially since translation modes and requirements change over time. The challenge of AI use for translatology and ancient languages is found therefore, among other things, in the “blind” study of ancient texts’ perception and transmission evolution, i.e. without any theoretical preconceptions, in order to re-examine previously unverifiable hypotheses and, if necessary, to offer new ones. We propose to apply our reflection to a particular case study, the 16th and 17th-century French translations of the Iliad and the Odyssey.
  • 5.30PM
    Le Siboire
    (5101 Boul. St-Laurent)
    Cocktail
  • 5.30PM
    Le Siboire
    (5101 Boul. St-Laurent)
    Performing the Greek Anthology
    Lynn Kozak (Université McGill)
  • Schedule
    Topic / Speaker
  • 08.30 AM - 5.00 PM
    C-6070-9
    Hackathon
    Event open to all, with registration (until October 1, 2022)
    Abstract In pluridisciplinary teams, participants will compete to present prototypes that use algorithmic methods in order explore and analyse the corpus of the Greek Anthology. Participants will have the opportunity to test the project’s APIs (“For a digital and collaborative edition of the Greek Anthology") and our partners' (such as the Palatine Library of Heidelberg, or the Perseus Digital Library). This last day will allow the use of what was produced during the CRCEN’s « Greek Anthology » project on the one hand, and during the workshop on the other hand, while bringing out new potentialities of research.

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